Resources

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Top 10 Ways of Recruiting High School Women into Your Computing Classes

Recruiting diverse students to computing requires that you spark their interest, build their confidence they can succeed, create a community where they feel like they belong, and help them see themselves as a "computing person". This Top 10 list offers practices that help you recruit high school girls to your computing courses.

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Top 5 Reasons You Should Work at a Startup

Top 5 Reasons You Should Work at a Startup

Listing the top five reasons to work at a startup, this card encourages computing professionals to consider jobs with members of the NCWIT Entrepreneurial Alliance. 

Reproduce this resource with the help of a copy center. Download our reproduction kit, containing the professionally designed PDF file (measuring 4.25" x 5.5") and a printing guide.

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Male Advocates and Allies: Promoting Gender Diversity in Technology Workplaces

This report, sponsored by NCWIT's Workforce Alliance, provides an inside look into how men think about  and advocate for diversity in the technical workplace. Drawing from interviews with 47 men in technical companies and departments, this study: 1) Identifies the factors that motivate or hinder men in advocating for gender diversity, 2) explores what diversity efforts men have experienced as successful or unsuccessful, and 3) identifies specific strategies to increase men's participation in advocacy.

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Who Invents IT? Women’s Participation in Information Technology Patenting, 2012 Update

The original 2007 report, Who Invents IT? An Analysis of Women’s Participation in Information Technology Patenting, examined the rates at which women have been patenting in information technology (IT), how these rates have evolved between 1980-2005, and how these rates differ across IT industry sub-categories and across specific organizations. This edition updates the previous report, exploring these trends from 2006-2010.

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Regional Celebrations-in-a-Box: Connecting Communities of Technical Women

Regional Celebrations-in-a-Box contains resources for organizing small conferences designed to increase the participation, retention, and advancement of technical women. This program-in-a-box is a compilation of materials and practices from Regional Celebrations around the country that bring women together in supportive communities for professional growth. The box includes advice about planning and materials for program elements such as intentional role modeling, group and individual mentoring, networking, and ways to share accurate career information.

Pair Programming-in-a-Box: The Power of Collaborative Learning

Pair Programming-in-a-Box: The Power of Collaborative Learning

Pair programming is a collaborative learning method in which students program in pairs instead of individually. This approach significantly improves college students' programming competency and increases the likelihood that both male and female students become and remain computer science majors. During pair programming, students work in tandem at one computer while completing regular programming assignments. The "driver" controls the mouse and keyboard while the "navigator" makes suggestions, points out errors, and asks questions.

How Can Leader-Member Relationships Promote Women's Retention and Advancement? Taking Stock of Leader-Member Relationships (Case Study 1)

How Can Leader-Member Relationships Promote Women's Retention and Advancement? Taking Stock of Leader-Member Relationships (Case Study 1)

Positive leader-member relationships are characterized by exchanges of trust, respect, and low formality. They measurably improve performance, job satisfaction, and commitment. This practice sheet offers sample survey items to help with conducting "relationship audits" that can be used for benchmarking the quality of leader-member relationships in an organization.

How Can You Re-Engineer Your Undergraduate Program to Increase Women's Representation in Computing? Small Steps Toward Systemic Change (Case Study 1)

How Can You Re-Engineer Your Undergraduate Program to Increase Women's Representation in Computing? Small Steps Toward Systemic Change (Case Study 1)

The socio-educational system a student experiences shapes participation in the major. Altering one element of that system is often not enough to create enduring change. When faculty members are ready to implement organizational innovation, success is more likely if they receive support from institutional leaders, have access to adequate resources, and are able to participate in decision-making about the change.

How Do You Introduce Computing in an Engaging Way? Unplugged (Case Study 2)

How Do You Introduce Computing in an Engaging Way? Unplugged (Case Study 2)

Engage students not already drawn to computing by creating academic and social environments where these students feel like they belong. Students respond positively to solving real-life problems that draw on their existing knowledge and interests and that involve collaboration in hands-on projects. “CS Unplugged” demystifies computing through hands-on activities, including one activity called “Sorting Network.” The activity employs kinetic learning and teamwork to illustrate parallel sorting networks to organize data.

How Do You Support Completion of Graduate Degrees and Engender Commitment to a Research Career? Advisor as Steward of the Discipline (Case Study 1)

How Do You Support Completion of Graduate Degrees and Engender Commitment to a Research Career? Advisor as Steward of the Discipline (Case Study 1)

Students most likely to complete their graduate studies are those who are viewed as junior colleagues in a positive relationship with their advisors and who are well integrated into their department’s or lab’s intellectual community. Where one woman graduate student finds support and guidance from her advisor, another is stifled by her advisor’s inconsistent and inappropriate behavior. Systems of accountability, together with trained and caring advisors, increase the chances that doctoral students will successfully navigate the path to research careers.

Supervising-in-a-Box Series: Employee Development

Supervising-in-a-Box Series: Employee Development

Supervising-in-a-Box Series helps establish supportive and effective relationships with a diverse range of employees. This box explores ways to reduce or remove unconscious bias, discriminatory practices, and institutional barriers while performing supervisory job functions – including recruitment, project management, performance evaluations, feedback processes, and everyday communication. Employee Development focuses on ensuring that employees contribute their best ideas and talents to the team.

Evaluating a Mentoring Program Guide

Evaluating a Mentoring Program Guide

Need help evaluating your mentoring program? This resource provides a step-by-step plan with example metrics for evaluating a workplace mentoring program (in either industry or academia). Recommendations are based on best practices in professional program evaluation. This guide can be used as a companion resource to NCWIT's Mentoring-in-a-Box: Technical Women at Work available at www.ncwit.org/imentor and NCWIT's Mentoring-in-a-Box: Women Faculty in Computing at www.ncwit.org/facultymentor.

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By the Numbers

NCWIT's Women in IT: By the Numbers presents the most compelling statistics on women's participation in IT on a single page.

Gender Differences in Firm Size, Growth, and Persistence: A Review of Research Literature on Women's Entrepreneurship in the Information Technology Field

Entrepreneurial Series Report #1 summarizes research literature on women's entrepreneurship in the information technology field with a focus on gender differences in firm size, growth, and persistence.

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