Resources

NCWIT Scorecard

NCWIT Scorecard: A Report on the Status of Women in Information Technology

The NCWIT Scorecard shows trends in girls' and women's participation in computing in the U.S. over time, providing a benchmark for measuring progress and identifying areas for improvement.

Gender and Computing Conference Papers

More than 40 years of data on authors of ACM conference papers describe women’s contribution to this important aspect of computing professional life. The data show that women’s authorship increased substantially over time, and that relative to their representation in the likely pool of ACM conference paper authors, women Ph.D.s were especially productive. Initial tests indicate that the increase in women’s share of papers was due in large part to the increase in number of women in the community of potential authors.

Community College Pathway to IT and Computing Careers

Community College Pathway to IT and Computing Careers

Part of Counselors for Computing, this card connect students' interests with IT and computing career paths that can be achieved through enrollment in a community college. Degrees are linked to job titles, projected growth, and wages. Counselors for Computing (C4C) is a project of the NCWIT K-12 Alliance, made possible by the Merck Company Foundation.

 

NCWIT Resources: Inspiring Girls to Pursue Careers in Information Technology

The February 2011 National Girls Collaborative Project Webinar, NCWIT Resources: Inspiring Girls to Pursue Careers in Information Technology, is archived at the NGCP website. This webcast highlights free materials and information for attracting more girls and underrepresented groups to computing and information technology and shares how formal and informal educators are using these resources to strengthen programming for girls. An archive of the webinar and the final powerpoint slides are available for viewing:

How Can REUs Help Retain Female Undergraduates? Affinity Research Groups (Case Study 2)

How Can REUs Help Retain Female Undergraduates? Affinity Research Groups (Case Study 2)

Undergraduates with positive research experiences feel more confident and motivated to enter graduate programs. To facilitate successful REUs, supportive faculty advisors or graduate mentors should clearly communicate goals to students and allow them to spend a large amount of time on research, increasing independence as the project progresses. The Affinity Research Group model (ARG) integrates student participation in research teams and a structured cooperative learning environment.

How Do You Introduce Computing in an Engaging Way? Unplugged (Case Study 2)

How Do You Introduce Computing in an Engaging Way? Unplugged (Case Study 2)

Engage students not already drawn to computing by creating academic and social environments where these students feel like they belong. Students respond positively to solving real-life problems that draw on their existing knowledge and interests and that involve collaboration in hands-on projects. “CS Unplugged” demystifies computing through hands-on activities, including one activity called “Sorting Network.” The activity employs kinetic learning and teamwork to illustrate parallel sorting networks to organize data.

Talking Points

Institutional Barriers & Their Effects: How can I talk to colleagues about these issues?

Institutional barriers (IBs) are policies, procedures, or situations that systematically disadvantage certain groups of people. IBs exist in any majority-minority group situation. When an initial population is fairly similar (e.g., in male-dominated professions), systems naturally emerge to meet the needs of this population. If these systems do not change with the times, they can inhibit the success of new members with different needs. IBs often seem natural or “just the way things are around here.”

Which computing majors are right for me?

Which computing majors are right for me?

This card, co-branded with ACM, explains how computing interests and talents line up with different undergraduate degrees and the careers that follow.

How Do You Introduce Computing in an Engaging Way? Snap, Create, and Share with Scratch (Case Study 5)

How Do You Introduce Computing in an Engaging Way? Snap, Create, and Share with Scratch (Case Study 5)

Engage students not already drawn to computing by creating academic and social environments where these students feel like they belong. Students respond positively to solving real-life problems that draw on their existing knowledge and interests and that involve collaboration in hands-on projects. Scratch is a free “media rich programming environment” in which novice programmers can quickly express their creativity while learning computational thinking.

How Do You Introduce Computing in an Engaging Way? Storytelling (Case Study 1)

How Do You Introduce Computing in an Engaging Way? Storytelling (Case Study 1)

Engage students not already drawn to computing by creating academic and social environments where these students feel like they belong. Students respond positively to solving real-life problems that draw on their existing knowledge and interests and that involve collaboration in hands-on projects. By focusing on problem-solving skills, the computer programming environment “Learning to Program with Alice” takes a new approach that helps students see programming as a series of causal relationships.

NCWIT Fact Sheet

NCWIT Fact Sheet

The NCWIT Fact Sheet provides a one-page description of NCWIT at-a-glance: why we exist, who we are, and what we do.

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