Resources

Promising Practices Catalog

Promising Practices Catalog

This document presents very brief summaries of promising and effective practices identified by NCWIT social scientists and will evolve as more practices are developed and recognized. The practices summarized here aim to 1) Increase the numbers of girls and women in computing. They have goals or benefits related to recruiting, retaining, or advancing the diverse range of females. 2) Make diversity in computing matter to individuals, organizations, and society. They have goals or benefits related to innovation, communication, and talent development.

Encouragement Practice - Case Study 3

How Can Encouragement Increase Persistence in Computing? One Professor’s Approach to Broadening Participation in Computing (Case Study 3)

Encouragement increases self-efficacy, which is the belief in one’s ability to successfully perform a task. Because we are more likely to engage in tasks that we believe we can perform successfully, encouragement may be especially useful for attracting women to male-stereotyped fields such as computing. The case study written by Gloria Townsend describes the impact she and her colleagues have had by making encouraging comments to women in their courses.

CACM Cover Image

Bringing Young Women into Computing Through the NCWIT Aspirations in Computing Program

Article in CACM describing the obstacles girls face in entering computing and how the Aspirations program seeks to overcome those. Great overview of issues, the Aspirations program and ways individuals can get involved with the program.

Why Should Young People Consider Careers in Information Technology?

Created for school counselors by Counselors for Computing (C4C), a project of the NCWIT K-12 Alliance made possible by the Merck Company Foundation, this card gives adults talking points and additional resources for a conversation with their students, children, and/or other young people. The main message is that IT offers meaningful work, security and high salaries with a bachelor’s degree, and flexibility and variety. Information is provided to address these specific questions: What should you tell a young person about a career in IT?

How Do You Recruit or Retain Women Through Inclusive Pedagogy? The Conversational Classroom (Case Study 1)

How Do You Recruit or Retain Women Through Inclusive Pedagogy? The Conversational Classroom (Case Study 1)

Women and minority students are not in computing courses under the same conditions as their white male classmates. Instructional practices offer opportunities to level the playing field and improve the retention of underrepresented students. Professor William Waite abstained from lecturing his students on assigned reading and relied instead on the students to direct the information discussed in the classroom.

How Does Engaging Curriculum Attract Students to Computing? Media Computation at Georgia Tech (Case Study 1)

How Does Engaging Curriculum Attract Students to Computing? Media Computation at Georgia Tech (Case Study 1)

Making curricula more relevant to students, introducing collaborative learning into the classroom, and tailoring courses to different student experience levels benefit female as well as male students. This approach to introductory computing involves encouraging social interaction and creativity while presenting subject matter that is relevant to non-computing majors. Evaluation at Georgia Tech showed that the Media Computation approach resulted in increased student success rates (earning an A, B, or C) from 72 percent to about 85-90 percent.

Stereotype Threat Cover Slide

Stereotypes and Stereotype Threat Affect Computing Students

This slide deck is a companion piece to the NCWIT Talking Point Card Talk with Faculty Colleagues About Stereotype Threat (www.ncwit.org/stereotypethreattp). You can hand out the card to your colleagues and then share these slides at a faculty meeting. 

Pair Programming-in-a-Box: The Power of Collaborative Learning

Pair Programming-in-a-Box: The Power of Collaborative Learning

Pair programming is a collaborative learning method in which students program in pairs instead of individually. This approach significantly improves college students' programming competency and increases the likelihood that both male and female students become and remain computer science majors. During pair programming, students work in tandem at one computer while completing regular programming assignments. The "driver" controls the mouse and keyboard while the "navigator" makes suggestions, points out errors, and asks questions.

How Do You Recruit or Retain Women through Inclusive Pedagogy? Designing for Diversity (Case Study 2)

How Do You Recruit or Retain Women through Inclusive Pedagogy? Designing for Diversity (Case Study 2)

Women and minority students are not in computing courses under the same conditions as their white male classmates. Instructional practices offer opportunities to level the playing field and improve the retention of underrepresented students. A new, smaller introductory computer science class tailored for inexperienced students at the University of Virginia recruited more minority and women students and resulted in many more students declaring a major in computer science.

How Do You Recruit or Retain Women Through Inclusive Pedagogy? Equal Access: Inclusive Strategies for Teaching Students with Disabilities (Case Study 3)

How Do You Recruit or Retain Women Through Inclusive Pedagogy? Equal Access: Inclusive Strategies for Teaching Students with Disabilities (Case Study 3)

Women and minority students are not in computing courses under the same conditions as their white male classmates. Instructional practices offer opportunities to level the playing field and improve the retention of underrepresented students. More students with learning and physical disabilities are in the educational pipeline than ever before. Being aware of the issues, tools, and services for students with disabilities makes it easier for them to learn and for you to teach them.

Gearing Up for Change

Gearing Up for Change: Institutional Reform in Undergraduate Computing Programs

Change agents must understand and consider their organization’s complex and interlocking systems. Plans for change must ensure that subsystems work in harmony with each other to reinforce the envisioned change. This resource outlines the prerequisites to transforming for diversity in undergraduate computing and explains NCWIT’s Extension Services for Undergraduate Programs (ES-UP). Members of the Academic Alliance are entitled to free services from the NCWIT ES-UP in support of their organizational change.

America's Got Talent but Not Enough Is Going into Computer Science

America's Got Talent but Not Enough Is Going into Computer Science

CS Principles is a new Advanced Placement computing course in development by NSF and the College Board, designed to be engaging, inspiring, and rigorous. This resource provides the rationale for CS Principles and describes how to support its implementation.

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