Resources

How Can REUs Help Retain Female Undergraduates? Faculty Perspectives (Case Study 1)

How Can REUs Help Retain Female Undergraduates? Faculty Perspectives (Case Study 1)

Undergraduates with positive research experiences feel more confident and motivated to enter graduate programs. To facilitate successful REUs, supportive faculty advisors or graduate mentors should clearly communicate goals to students and allow them to spend a large amount of time on research, increasing independence as the project progresses. Professors Scott McCrickard of Virginia Tech University and Margaret Burnett of Oregon State University treat their undergraduate researchers as members of their respective research teams.

How Can Encouragement Increase Persistence in Computing? Encouragement Works in Academic Settings (Case Study 1)

How Can Encouragement Increase Persistence in Computing? Encouragement Works in Academic Settings (Case Study 1)

Encouragement increases self-efficacy, which is the belief in one’s ability to successfully perform a task. Because we are more likely to engage in tasks that we believe we can perform successfully, encouragement may be especially useful for attracting women to male-stereotyped fields such as computing. Simple though encouragement is, fewer than half of the faculty members in the average computer science department in the United States say they do it.

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How to Create and Sustain a Women in Computing Group on Your Campus

Women's groups can help to retain students and can provide an infrastructure for local activism. This brief guide discusses how to get a group started and to build its structure, the importance of maintaining an open and public presence, possible activities, ways to build membership, and the value of affiliating with other groups.

NCWIT Scorecard

NCWIT Scorecard: A Report on the Status of Women in Information Technology

The NCWIT Scorecard shows trends in girls' and women's participation in computing in the U.S. over time, providing a benchmark for measuring progress and identifying areas for improvement.
How Do Admissions Criteria Affect Women's Representation in Graduate Computing? Attempts to Equalize a Subjective Process (Case Study 1)

How Do Admissions Criteria Affect Women's Representation in Graduate Computing? Attempts to Equalize a Subjective Process (Case Study 1)

When admission committee members minimize the biasing effects of stereotypes and consider applicants’ membership in an under-represented group as a positive characteristic, they promote diversity. By looking carefully at women and considering their life experiences, University of California, San Diego and University of California, Berkeley admit more women students than their peer institutions.

How Do You Provide Intentional Role Modeling? Regional Celebrations of Women in Computing - R-CWIC (Case Study 1)

How Do You Provide Intentional Role Modeling? Regional Celebrations of Women in Computing - R-CWIC (Case Study 1)

In addition to demonstrating expertise and experience, intentional role models display their strengths and weaknesses and help observers see how they could attain a similar position. Role modeling is less interactive than mentoring, but is often a component of mentoring relationships. Women attending the Indiana and Ohio Celebrations of Women in Computing observe role models who are keynote speakers from technical fields, panelists with technical careers in industry, and presenters of technical papers.

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Talk with Faculty Colleagues About Stereotype Threat

This Talking Point Card explains stereotype threat and how it is triggered, shares examples of effects from stereotype threat, and suggests ways to create a stereotype threat-free environment for attracting able and diverse students to computing.

How Does Engaging Curriculum Attract Students to Computing? Media Computation at Georgia Tech (Case Study 1)

How Does Engaging Curriculum Attract Students to Computing? Media Computation at Georgia Tech (Case Study 1)

Making curricula more relevant to students, introducing collaborative learning into the classroom, and tailoring courses to different student experience levels benefit female as well as male students. This approach to introductory computing involves encouraging social interaction and creativity while presenting subject matter that is relevant to non-computing majors. Evaluation at Georgia Tech showed that the Media Computation approach resulted in increased student success rates (earning an A, B, or C) from 72 percent to about 85-90 percent.

Which computing majors are right for me?

Which computing majors are right for me?

This card, co-branded with ACM, explains how computing interests and talents line up with different undergraduate degrees and the careers that follow.

How Do Stereotype Threats Affect Retention? Better Approaches to Well-Intentioned, but Harmful Messages (Case Study 1)

How Do Stereotype Threats Affect Retention? Better Approaches to Well-Intentioned, but Harmful Messages (Case Study 1)

Stereotype threat harms both performance and motivation by reducing our feelings of competence, belonging, and trust in our colleagues. However, careful thought, education, and regular assessment of diversity practices can help minimize incidents of stereotype threat. Examples show how instructors and advisors can minimize stereotype threat by creating an accepting environment where students feel at ease and are recognized for their achievements. In addition, student test scores improve and gender gaps are eliminated when students are taught that intelligence increases through effort.

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Comparing U.S. K-12 Students' Math and Science Performance Internationally: What are the facts, what do they mean for educational reform, and how do I talk effectively about the issues?

In the popular press and in public debate, one often hears that U.S. students are performing poorly in math and science in comparison to other countries. What is the basis for these claims? What are students’ actual scores and rankings? How should we interpret and use these scores? A better understanding of the evidence is important for making effective policy decisions that affect computer science and other STEM fields.

 

NCWIT Resources: Inspiring Girls to Pursue Careers in Information Technology

The February 2011 National Girls Collaborative Project Webinar, NCWIT Resources: Inspiring Girls to Pursue Careers in Information Technology, is archived at the NGCP website. This webcast highlights free materials and information for attracting more girls and underrepresented groups to computing and information technology and shares how formal and informal educators are using these resources to strengthen programming for girls. An archive of the webinar and the final powerpoint slides are available for viewing:

How Do You Recruit or Retain Women Through Inclusive Pedagogy? Equal Access: Inclusive Strategies for Teaching Students with Disabilities (Case Study 3)

How Do You Recruit or Retain Women Through Inclusive Pedagogy? Equal Access: Inclusive Strategies for Teaching Students with Disabilities (Case Study 3)

Women and minority students are not in computing courses under the same conditions as their white male classmates. Instructional practices offer opportunities to level the playing field and improve the retention of underrepresented students. More students with learning and physical disabilities are in the educational pipeline than ever before. Being aware of the issues, tools, and services for students with disabilities makes it easier for them to learn and for you to teach them.

Evaluating a Mentoring Program Guide

Evaluating a Mentoring Program Guide

Need help evaluating your mentoring program? This resource provides a step-by-step plan with example metrics for evaluating a workplace mentoring program (in either industry or academia). Recommendations are based on best practices in professional program evaluation. This guide can be used as a companion resource to NCWIT's Mentoring-in-a-Box: Technical Women at Work available at www.ncwit.org/imentor and NCWIT's Mentoring-in-a-Box: Women Faculty in Computing at www.ncwit.org/facultymentor.

Community College Pathway to IT and Computing Careers

Community College Pathway to IT and Computing Careers

Part of Counselors for Computing, this card connect students' interests with IT and computing career paths that can be achieved through enrollment in a community college. Degrees are linked to job titles, projected growth, and wages. Counselors for Computing (C4C) is a project of the NCWIT K-12 Alliance, made possible by the Merck Company Foundation.

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