Resources

Why Should Young People Consider Careers in Information Technology?

Created for school counselors by Counselors for Computing (C4C), a project of the NCWIT K-12 Alliance made possible by the Merck Company Foundation, this card gives adults talking points and additional resources for a conversation with their students, children, and/or other young people. The main message is that IT offers meaningful work, security and high salaries with a bachelor’s degree, and flexibility and variety. Information is provided to address these specific questions: What should you tell a young person about a career in IT?

Promising Practices Catalog

Promising Practices Catalog

This document presents very brief summaries of promising and effective practices identified by NCWIT social scientists and will evolve as more practices are developed and recognized. The practices summarized here aim to 1) Increase the numbers of girls and women in computing. They have goals or benefits related to recruiting, retaining, or advancing the diverse range of females. 2) Make diversity in computing matter to individuals, organizations, and society. They have goals or benefits related to innovation, communication, and talent development.

 

Assessing Girls’ Interest, Confidence, and Participation in Computing Activities: Results for Globaloria in West Virginia

This report examines the effects of participation in Globaloria on girls' interests, confidence, and participation in computing activities by analyzing pre- and post- test data for Globaloria participants and enrollment data for Globaloria elective courses. Results demonstrate that outcomes of Globaloria participation among girls include an increase in several home computing activities for girls, and that total female enrollment in elective Globaloria courses is higher than the national average for female enrollment in computing courses.

By the Numbers

NCWIT's Women in IT: By the Numbers presents the most compelling statistics on women's participation in IT on a single page.

What are the Important Components of Targeted Recruiting? Girls Exploring Science, Engineering, and Technology Event - GESET (Case Study 1)

What are the Important Components of Targeted Recruiting? Girls Exploring Science, Engineering, and Technology Event - GESET (Case Study 1)

Targeted recruiting means planning strategically: set quantifiable goals; identify large, capable audiences; personalize the content of your message; deliver that message in media that are relevant to your audience; and pay attention to people who influence your audience’s decision-making. GESET annually introduces 1,200 middle school girls to the importance of STEM and IT education through hands-on activities and presentation of real-life applications of technology.

Outreach-in-a-Box: Discovering IT

Outreach-in-a-Box: Discovering IT

A program to strengthen and diversify the IT pipeline though outreach to middle schools. Using the box, IT professionals customize and deliver a classroom presentation and engage youth in hands-on activities that inspire and inform them about opportunities in IT.

 

Counselor Lesson Plan

Counselor Lesson Plan (PDF)

Counselors and others in an advising role can use this interactive lesson plan to introduce middle and high school students to computing and careers.

NCWIT AspireIT: Grant Recipient

NCWIT AspireIT: Grant Recipient (Online Badge)

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CACM Cover Image

Bringing Young Women into Computing Through the NCWIT Aspirations in Computing Program

Article in CACM describing the obstacles girls face in entering computing and how the Aspirations program seeks to overcome those. Great overview of issues, the Aspirations program and ways individuals can get involved with the program.

How Do You Introduce Computing in an Engaging Way? Teaching Programming and Language Concepts Using LEGOs® (Case Study 4)

How Do You Introduce Computing in an Engaging Way? Teaching Programming and Language Concepts Using LEGOs® (Case Study 4)

Engage students not already drawn to computing by creating academic and social environments where these students feel like they belong. Students respond positively to solving real-life problems that draw on their existing knowledge and interests and that involve collaboration in hands-on projects. In this easy-to-implement classroom activity, individual LEGOS® bricks are used to express a special-purpose programming language, allowing students to kinetically approach concepts and skills in computing in a non-intimidating fashion.

NCWIT Aspirations in Computing Educator Award: Recipient

NCWIT Aspirations in Computing Educator Award: Recipient (Online Badge)

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