Talking Points

Stereotype Threat Cover Image

Talk with Faculty Colleagues About Stereotype Threat

This Talking Point Card explains stereotype threat and how it is triggered, shares examples of effects from stereotype threat, and suggests ways to create a stereotype threat-free environment for attracting able and diverse students to computing.

Why Should Young Women Consider a Career in Information Technology?

Why Should Young Women Consider a Career in Information Technology?

This card gives adults talking points and additional resources for a conversation with their daughters and/or other young people. The main message is that IT offers meaningful work, security and high salaries with a bachelor’s degree, and flexibility and variety. Information is provided to address these specific questions: What should you tell a young woman about a career in IT? How can a young woman prepare now for a career in IT?

Moving Beyond Computer Literacy: Why schools should teach computer science

Moving Beyond Computer Literacy: Why schools should teach computer science

Computer Science — not computer literacy — underlies most innovation today, yet the majority of U.S. schools require only that students use computers. Computer science teaches students design, logical reasoning, and problem solving — all valuable well beyond the computer science classroom. This resource provides information about the value of computer science curriculum for students, educators, local and national economies as well as global society. It offers steps schools can take to successfully incorporate computer science education.

Talking Points

Institutional Barriers & Their Effects: How can I talk to colleagues about these issues?

Institutional barriers (IBs) are policies, procedures, or situations that systematically disadvantage certain groups of people. IBs exist in any majority-minority group situation. When an initial population is fairly similar (e.g., in male-dominated professions), systems naturally emerge to meet the needs of this population. If these systems do not change with the times, they can inhibit the success of new members with different needs. IBs often seem natural or “just the way things are around here.”

Talking Points

Comparing U.S. K-12 Students' Math and Science Performance Internationally: What are the facts, what do they mean for educational reform, and how do I talk effectively about the issues?

In the popular press and in public debate, one often hears that U.S. students are performing poorly in math and science in comparison to other countries. What is the basis for these claims? What are students’ actual scores and rankings? How should we interpret and use these scores? A better understanding of the evidence is important for making effective policy decisions that affect computer science and other STEM fields.

Why Should Young People Consider Careers in Information Technology?

Created for school counselors by Counselors for Computing (C4C), a project of the NCWIT K-12 Alliance made possible by the Merck Company Foundation, this card gives adults talking points and additional resources for a conversation with their students, children, and/or other young people. The main message is that IT offers meaningful work, security and high salaries with a bachelor’s degree, and flexibility and variety. Information is provided to address these specific questions: What should you tell a young person about a career in IT?

¿Por qué las jóvenes deberían considerar una carrera en tecnología de la información?

Spanish version of Why Should Young Women Consider a Career in Information Technology? This card gives adults talking points and additional resources for a conversation with their daughters and/or other young people. The main message is that IT offers meaningful work, security and high salaries with a bachelor’s degree, and flexibility and variety. Information is provided to address these specific questions: What should you tell a young woman about a career in IT? How can a young woman prepare now for a career in IT?