Resources

Pair Programming-in-a-Box: The Power of Collaborative Learning

Pair Programming-in-a-Box: The Power of Collaborative Learning

Pair programming is a collaborative learning method in which students program in pairs instead of individually. This approach significantly improves college students' programming competency and increases the likelihood that both male and female students become and remain computer science majors. During pair programming, students work in tandem at one computer while completing regular programming assignments. The "driver" controls the mouse and keyboard while the "navigator" makes suggestions, points out errors, and asks questions.

How Do You Support Completion of Graduate Degrees and Engender Commitment to a Research Career? Advisor as Steward of the Discipline (Case Study 1)

How Do You Support Completion of Graduate Degrees and Engender Commitment to a Research Career? Advisor as Steward of the Discipline (Case Study 1)

Students most likely to complete their graduate studies are those who are viewed as junior colleagues in a positive relationship with their advisors and who are well integrated into their department’s or lab’s intellectual community. Where one woman graduate student finds support and guidance from her advisor, another is stifled by her advisor’s inconsistent and inappropriate behavior. Systems of accountability, together with trained and caring advisors, increase the chances that doctoral students will successfully navigate the path to research careers.

By the Numbers

NCWIT's Women in IT: By the Numbers presents the most compelling statistics on women's participation in IT on a single page.

Networking and Access to Social Capital: A Review of Research Literature on Women's Entrepreneurship in the Information Technology Field

Entrepreneurial Series Report #4 summarizes research literature on women's entrepreneurship in the information technology field with a focus on networking and access to social capital.

Who Invents IT Thumbnail

Who Invents IT? Women’s Participation in Information Technology Patenting, 2012 Update

The original 2007 report, Who Invents IT? An Analysis of Women’s Participation in Information Technology Patenting, examined the rates at which women have been patenting in information technology (IT), how these rates have evolved between 1980-2005, and how these rates differ across IT industry sub-categories and across specific organizations. This edition updates the previous report, exploring these trends from 2006-2010.

Counselor Lesson Plan

Counselor Lesson Plan (PDF)

Counselors and others in an advising role can use this interactive lesson plan to introduce middle and high school students to computing and careers.

How Do You Introduce Computing in an Engaging Way? Storytelling (Case Study 1)

How Do You Introduce Computing in an Engaging Way? Storytelling (Case Study 1)

Engage students not already drawn to computing by creating academic and social environments where these students feel like they belong. Students respond positively to solving real-life problems that draw on their existing knowledge and interests and that involve collaboration in hands-on projects. By focusing on problem-solving skills, the computer programming environment “Learning to Program with Alice” takes a new approach that helps students see programming as a series of causal relationships.

Ed Jobs Map

Computing Education and Future Jobs: A Look at National, State & Congressional District Data

This report includes data about IT jobs and computer science education, disaggregated by state and congressional district.

Or, use the interactive map to look at education and jobs in your area.

Top 10 Ways to Thrive in Your Technical Career

Top 10 Ways to Thrive in Your Technical Career

This resource provides tips mid-career technical women can use to advance their careers.

View online.

Resources for Retaining and Advancing Mid-career Technical Women Guide

Resources for Retaining and Advancing Mid-career Technical Women Guide

Managers and others can use this guide to find NCWIT resources that will help them create highly-productive, diverse technical teams. Resources are catalogued by the key “change areas” identified in the NCWIT Change Model for Industry: 1) Top Leadership Support, 2) Supervisory Relationships, 3) Recruitment and Selection, 4) Talent Development and Mentoring, 5) Performance Evaluation and Promotion, 6) Support for Competing Responsibilities, 7) Reduction of Subtle Biases, and 8) Ongoing Evaluation.  Space also exists for adding company-specific resources into the guide.

How Does Combating Overt Sexism Affect Women's Retention? Assessments for Identifying Overt Sexism (Case Study 1)

How Does Combating Overt Sexism Affect Women's Retention? Assessments for Identifying Overt Sexism (Case Study 1)

Sexism has measurably harmful effects, but sexist behavior can be minimized. Instructors and supervisors can practice zero tolerance and facilitate positive peer interactions, and they can provide highly visible leadership, policies, and procedures that go beyond legalities to explicitly denounce sexism. This case study identifies available surveys and issues that should be considered when assessing the prevalence of sexist behavior in an organization.

How Can Reducing Unconscious Bias Increase Women's Success in IT? Avoiding Unintended Bias in Letters of Recommendation (Case Study 1)

How Can Reducing Unconscious Bias Increase Women's Success in IT? Avoiding Unintended Bias in Letters of Recommendation (Case Study 1)

Research shows that even individuals committed to equality harbor unconscious biases that impact everyday decisions and interactions. In the IT workplace, unconscious gender bias can mislead employers, both male and female, to make inaccurate judgments in hiring, performance reviews, and promotion. This case study highlights findings on the differences between letters of recommendation for women and men and gives practical ways to reduce bias when writing letters of recommendation.

International Women's Day-in-a-Box

International Women's Day-in-a-Box: Raising Awareness, Igniting Change

International Women's Day-in-a-Box: Raising Awareness, Igniting Change is designed to help IT companies and departments celebrate successes and address barriers to women's full participation in IT, and capitalize on women's innovative thinking and leadership potential. If your organization is eager to promote diversity in order to become globally competitive, then International Women's Day-in-a-Box is for you. Use this resource to plan company activities and events, and to establish a culture and expectation for broader diversity of thought in IT.

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