Did You Know: Women CIOs, Raspberry Pi, Coursera

Summit Attendees

Did you know that the NCWIT Summit in Chicago happens next week? For those of you who are not able to join us, we hope you'll tune into the live stream video, made possible thanks to support from NCWIT Investment Sponsor, Turner Broadcasting System, Inc. We'll be live-streaming the main Summit events including keynotes, workshops, and panels, and we'll archive the footage as well for later viewing. Check it out, May 22- 24 at http://www.ncwit.org/summitlive.

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Did you know that scientists who are parents are more likely to engage in outreach to the general public? Recent research from Rice and Southern Methodist Universities, published in PLoS ONE, found that academic scientists face significant barriers to outreach -- including the perception that outreach may hurt their research output, and that the public is disinterested in learning about the sciences. However, some scientists still engage in outreach activities, and the strongest correlation with outreach was found with female scientists and those who have children.

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The New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman recently wrote about Coursera, a platform of free, online courses from institutions such as Princeton, Stanford, University of California at Berkeley, University of Michigan, and the University of Pennsylvania. Coursera uses a "flipped classroom" model (where students watch videotaped lectures at home and spend "class" time working directly with the professor or their peers), which is designed to increase student engagement and mastery learning. Coursera was co-founded by two Stanford computer science professors and computing courses are among the most popular offerings so far. 

What do you think about making computer science courses free and available to the general population? Have you experimented with the flipped classroom? Do you think online learning can be as effective as a live classroom?

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Did you know that the NCWIT Summit takes place in Chicago next week? Even if you're not able to join us in person, we hope you'll be able to join us online for the live-streamed events. But there's another women-in-tech event happening next week that we wanted to make sure was on your radar, too: the 4th Annual Women Who Tech Telesummit. This event takes place from 11 AM to 5 PM ET on Wednesday, May 23, and it features panels such as Funding Your Own Startup, Changing the World with Open Source, Using Technology and Social Media to Build Social Movements, Digital Rights and Online Privacy, Diversifying your Tech Teams, and Women in Tech Internationally. Kaliya Hamlin of AGA member She's Geeky is a featured speaker. Tickets for the telesummit (available via phone and web) are $20. 

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Did you know that this week has been Startup Week here in Boulder? The purpose of the many meetups, brewery tours, and informal coffee house gatherings is to highlight the city's startup culture as an immensely appealing one for potential job candidates. Like other cities with burgeoning startup ecosystems, tech talent is in heavy demand in Boulder, and local companies are pulling out all the stops to attract talent. We noticed that NYC has done something similar, too, in celebration of Internet Week: it built an interactive map showing the locations of the city's tech companies, investors, and incubators. Have you identified new hires from events or tools like these? What's your city doing to help you attract talent?

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Did you hear about the $25 computer? The UK-based Raspberry Pi Foundation believes that putting low-cost, no-frills computers into the hands of kids will encourage them to immerse themselves in creative programming. The computer itself is about the size of credit card, with a USB drive on one end, 256 MB of RAM, and enough power to support audio and video. The Foundation estimates that it's already sold more than a quarter of a million units and is working with curriculum designers and others to develop tutorials and prizes that give kids a passion to put it to use.

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Did you know that a recent survey of 450 CIOs of U.S. companies found that female CIOs are on the decline? At 9%, the number of women CIOs is down from 11% in 2011 and 12% in 2010. Globally the number of women CIOs is 7%. Recruitment firm Harvey Nash, which administered the survey, speculates that women's absence from senior-level technical posts can be a self-fulfilling prophecy, because it can send a message that women aren't welcome or promoted. "The skills shortage is the biggest it's ever been, and it's going to cause companies to get a little more creative in shifting the culture of organizations … that shift is already taking place at small companies, but large ones have yet to change their culture."

Did You Know? is a brief round-up of information and news that crossed NCWIT's radar this week that we think might be of interest to you. Practices or content of the news presented are not vetted or endorsed by NCWIT.