K-12 Alliance Members

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4-H

4-H

More than 6 million 4-H youth in urban neighborhoods, suburban schoolyards and rural farming communities stand out among their peers: building revolutionary opportunities and implementing community-wide change at an early age. With 540,000 volunteers, 3,500 professionals, and more than 60 million alumni, the 4-H movement supports young people from elementary school through high school with programs designed to shape future leaders and innovators. Fueled by research-driven programming, 4-H'ers engage in hands-on learning activities in the areas of science, citizenship and healthy living.

  • Jim Kahler, Ed Bender
ACTE

ACTE Guidance and Career Development Division

The mission of ACTE's Guidance and Career Development Division is to provide leadership and advocacy for school counselors, career development personnel and other guidance professionals. ACTE collaboratea with other professional education groups to maintain and advance a strong voice for the full implementation of comprehensive guidance programs and the work of career development personnel. They also disseminate CTE information to school counselors, career development personnel and other guidance professionals and
inform CTE professionals about the goals and outcomes of fully implemented comprehensive guidance programs.

  • Lela (Lee) Kosteck Bunch
Afterschool Alliance

Afterschool Alliance

The Afterschool Alliance works to ensure that all children have access to affordable, quality afterschool programs. 8.4 million children participate in afterschool programs around the nation, but more than 15.1 million children are on their own after school ends. The nation's leading voice for afterschool, we are the only organization dedicated to raising awareness of the importance of afterschool programs and advocating for more afterschool investments. Our STEM work focuses on creating and advancing federal, state, and local opportunities and policies to expand resources and build systems and partnerships that provide students with access to a rich STEM curriculum in their afterschool programs.

 

American School Counselor Association (ASCA)

American School Counselor Association (ASCA)

The American School Counselor Association guides school counselors in supporting students focus on academic, social and career development so that they are able to accomplish all of their goals in school and are equipped with the proper tools to have rewarding lives. ASCA provides professional development, resources, research and advocacy to over 24,000 professional school counselors. ASCA heads a group of resources called Smart Girl, which are publications geared towards inspiring middle school girls to learn good decision-making skills, raise their self-esteem, and become capable and independent women.

  • Jill Cook

Association for Computing Machinery

ACM unites computing educators, researchers and professionals to inspire dialogue, share resources and address the field's challenges. Through its Special Interest Groups, ACM publishes the proceedings of more than 150 conferences and symposia each year. The ACM Digital Library provides an expanding bibliographic database of all relevant articles in computing, with over 1 million citations to date. ACM's mission includes assessing and influencing the impact of information technologies on all aspects of society. ACM also helps shape U.S. public policy, improve gender equity and diversity, and influence the teaching of computing and information technology.

Black Girls Code

Black Girls Code

Black Girls Code's mission is to empower young women of color between the ages of 7-14 to become the masters of their technological universe. Although the digital divide is steadily eroding, tremendous barriers remain for the entry of women and people of color into the technology field. Today's solutions should include both the access to technology and focus on the opportunity to increase the participation of young women of color in the current tech marketplace as builders and to expose them to the possibilities of improving both their lives and the society in which they live by utilizing the abundant technological tools around them to create change. BlackGirlsCode is an organization that has as its mission a goal of increasing the numbers of young women of color in the field of digital and computer technology by providing them with skills in computer programming, exposing them to role models in the technology space, and increasing their self-confidence by teaching them the skills required to become tech creators and entrepreneurs.

  • Kimberly Bryant
Bootstrap Logo

Bootstrap

Bootstrap is a standards-based curriculum for middle-school students, which teaches them to program their own videogames using purely algebraic and geometric concepts. The organization works with schools and teachers to integrate Bootstrap into their algebra classes and technology programs, as well as parents and afterschool programs across the country.

  • Emmanuel Schanzer
LERNet Logo

Boston University's Learning Resource Network (LERNet)

The Learning Resource Network (LERNet) is a center in the Boston University College of Arts & Sciences that collaborates with faculty in all departments to offer a wide range of STEM programs for K-12 students and professional development opportunities for teachers.  LERNet has organized dozens of programs, including Summer Pathways, a weeklong residential program for high school girls interested in STEM, and The Artemis Project, a five-week summer program for rising 9th grade girls focused on computing. LERNet has administered several large NSF grants, including three NSF GK12 programs which together have partnered over 100 graduate students with K-12 teachers in science classrooms around Boston, and an RET (Research Experiences for Teachers) that has engaged local teachers as researchers in BU engineering labs for six weeks during the summer. LERNet is a founding member of the Boston Area Girls STEM Collaborative, whose members are institutions in the Boston Area committed to advocating STEM for girls.  The group works collaboratively to develop programs and share resources. The Collaborative’s combined reach extends throughout Boston area and into parte of NE. The Collaborative hosts S.E.T. in the City, a daylong, multi-venue program for high school girls, and Tech Savvy, a week-long summer program for middle school girls focused on Technology, Engineering and Computing.

  • Cynthia Brossman

Boys & Girls Clubs of America (BGCA)

The Boys & Girls Clubs of America's mission is to enable all young people, especially those who need us most, to reach their full potential as productive, caring, responsible citizens.  A Boys & Girls Club provides: a safe place to learn and grow, ongoing relationships with caring, adult professionals, life-enhancing programs and character development experiences and hope and opportunity.

  • Danielle Johnson

Code.org

Code.org is a non-profit dedicated to growing computer programming education.  Our vision is that every student in every school should have the opportunity to learn computer science.  We believe computer science should be part of the core curriculum in education, alongside other science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) courses, such as biology, physics, chemistry and algebra.

  • Cameron Wilson, Laura Kline, Hadi Partovi

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