Workforce Alliance Members

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Merck logo

Merck

Merck's products cover a broad range of areas, including heart and respiratory health, infectious diseases, sun care and women's health. And they focus their research on conditions that affect millions of people around the world - diseases like Alzheimer's, diabetes and cancer - while building strengths in new areas like biologics. While they work to develop innovative therapies, they also work hard to make sure they're affordable. Merck sponsors NCWIT's Counselors for Computing (C4C) program.

  • Anne Spoldi
Microsoft logo

Microsoft

Microsoft has been supporting NCWIT's work since 2004 and is an active Strategic Partner. Microsoft and Microsoft Research have supported many initiatives to increase women's participation in technology across the K-12 education pipeline and into the IT workforce. Its programmatic support includes the Academic Alliance Seed Fund and the Aspirations in Computing program.

  • Keami Lewis

Morgan Stanley Company

Since its founding in 1935, Morgan Stanley and its people have helped redefine the meaning of financial services. The firm has continually broken new ground in advising our clients on strategic transactions, in pioneering the global expansion of finance and capital markets, and in providing new opportunities for individual and institutional investors. Click below to see a timeline of Morgan Stanley's growth, which parallels the history of modern finance.

Morgan Stanley is a leading global financial services firm providing a wide range of investment banking, securities, investment management and wealth management services. The Firm's employees serve clients worldwide including corporations, governments and individuals from more than 1,200 offices in 43 countries.

Motorola Solutions Logo

Motorola Solutions

Every moment, Motorola Solutions' innovations, products, and services play essential roles in people's lives. They make supply chains visible to retailers and entire power grids visible to utility workers. And they help companies deliver shipments at the moment they're promised. They do this by connecting them to seamless communication networks, applications and services, by providing them with real-time information, and by arming them with intuitive, nearly indestructible handheld devices.

  • Lynn Zielke